This Makes Iceland Worth It

Volcanic rock and snow mark the walk to the Blue Lagoon's entrance in Grindavik, Iceland. Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

Volcanic rock and snow mark the walk to the Blue Lagoon’s entrance in Grindavik, Iceland.
Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

I expect the Northern Lights to highlight my trip to Iceland, but my visit to the Blue Lagoon in Grindavik turns out to be even more heavenly. A geothermal spa, the Blue Lagoon features large pools of 100-degree bluish-white water, thanks to silica, algae, and minerals—all of which are great for your skin (especially for people who have psoriasis), but not so much for your hair, bathing suit, or jewelry.

Lava restaurant at the Blue Lagoon overlooks the spa pools. Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

Lava restaurant at the Blue Lagoon overlooks the spa pools.
Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

After a quick lunch at Lava, where I learn that Icelandic restaurants do a great job preparing vegetables for non-meat-eating crowd, the Brawny Sherpa and I change into our swimsuits and dash into the water.

Celeriac, cous-cous artfully presented at Lava restaurant at the Blue Lagoon, Iceland. Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

Celeriac, cous-cous artfully presented at Lava restaurant at the Blue Lagoon, Iceland.
Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

It’s instant bliss—steam rising from the water, the relative quiet, the open skies. This place is a large attraction, but we do not feel overwhelmed by any crowd. We rub silica on ourselves, and then algae, and have a cocktail, and then an in-water massage. We have almost melted by the time our visit is over. I could come back here every day. I could live here. Iceland might be in the far north, cold, icy, dark, but this place is heavenly.

—Lori Tripoli

Despite its popularity as a tourist destination, the Blue Lagoon geothermal spa in Grindavik, Iceland, is tranquil and not too crowded. Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

Despite its popularity as a tourist destination, the Blue Lagoon geothermal spa in Grindavik, Iceland, is tranquil and not too crowded.
Photo credit: M. Ciavardini

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